Archive for IVIG

Medicare Coverage for Home Infusion

Ah, election time…how I love the hordes of direct mailers, the nasty negative campaign ads, and the elusive non-answers given to moderator questions at the debates. But yet there is hope at election time. Hope that there can still be change for the better, that our elected officials will overcome their political biases and work together for the better of all Americans. One easy fix for the slew of problems facing our nation’s health care system is to change Medicare guidelines to expand coverage for home infusion patients. We recently published an article explaining in detail how the lack of Medicare funding increases patient costs, puts patients at risks, and how it can be addressed by our lawmakers. We encourage you to reach out to your elected officials and let them know about this issue. Read on for the full text of the article.

 

FULL TEXT OF ARTICLE

Recently, we received a referral from Peace Health Hospital to provide intravenous antibiotics to a patient living in Blaine.  This gentleman was admitted to the hospital for endocarditis, which is an infection of the heart valves.  The standard treatment protocol includes 6-8 weeks of antibiotics delivered through an IV line.  Since the patient cannot stay in a hospital for that long (without racking up a huge bill), home IV services such as ours are asked to provide care for these patients in their homes.  It is safe, efficient, and cost-effective for the medical system.  Patients love it because they get to heal in the comfort of their own home environment.

Sadly, the patient in Blaine was covered by Medicare.  This means that he would not have access to home infusion services, because Medicare does not pay for a majority of the costs associated with the care.  Medicare Part D will help cover the costs of the drugs involved, but not the supplies, equipment, and pharmacy-related services that make up more than half the cost of the therapy.  This patient now had three choices: travel to and from the hospital out-patient facility everyday for his medicine; check into a skilled nursing home for 6-8 weeks; or pay us out-of-pocket for our services.

Since the patient lived in Blaine, driving to the hospital daily was not an option due to his health and the travel time involved.  And although our cash rates are fair, the patient did not have the funds to pay us for our services.  His one remaining option was to go to a skilled nursing facility, even though his wish was to be at home with a supportive family.

Why does Medicare put patients in this position?  Why would they cover the services at the hospital, at nursing homes, and at outpatient clinics, but not at home?  Virtually all national private insurance companies, state Medicaid programs, and managed care organizations (such as Group Health) provide coverage for home infusion, but Medicare itself does not.

For most insurance companies, the decision to cover is obvious.  First, the cost of home infusion is far less than the same therapy delivered at a hospital or a skilled nursing home.  Second, the data is clear that patients suffering from infection are far better off at home, as they are much less likely to experience secondary infections that may result in unnecessary re-admissions to the hospital.  And last, most patients who are able certainly prefer to be at home, which offers a psychological boost and can further expedite the healing process.

Medicare could save hundreds of millions of dollars annually, protect patients from the risk of re-infection, potentially shorten the duration of therapy, and vastly improve the quality of life for patients.  Instead, time and money is wasted, patients are put at risk, and the U.S. taxpayer continues to foot the ever-increasing bill.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is the governmental agency that oversees Medicare.  They do not have the authority to change the coverage criteria for Medicare beneficiaries.  Instead, it is up to Congress to enact this change.  Given the current economic climate and the need to control health care spending, you would think that your representatives would be eager to cast a vote which closes this egregious coverage gap for our seniors and disabled Americans.  It is a rare win-win for all sides–a great opportunity to maintain Medicare solvency and do what is best for patients.

It is always effective to contact your local, state, and national representatives to let them know about this issue.  Urge them to become a co-sponsor of the House (H.R. 2195) and Senate (S. 1203) bills already introduced by their colleagues in Congress.

And if you or anyone you know has been put in a similar situation due to the lack of Medicare coverage, please reach out to us at Infusion Solutions.  We would be grateful for the opportunity to share your story with elected officials and industry leaders to further the argument to enact change now.

When it comes to healing and health, there is truly no place like home.

Now serving…Patient 1000!

Yesterday, Infusion Solutions reached a remarkable milestone for our business. At about 2:30 PM, we started patient number 1000!

That represents a big milestone for our company. When we started in April of 2010, our patient census was zero. No patients. Nobody. We began the process of building up the business, and through hard work, persistence, and over-the-top patient care, we eventually established ourselves as the go-to agency for infusion care in our service area. Of course, we are thankful and grateful to all of our referral partners who trust us to take care of their patients–without them, we would still be at zero. So a big THANK YOU to all that have had a hand in our success!

Here in the office we have had a little wager going as to when we would hit this milestone. Suffice it to say, none of us expected to be here so soon. But at the same time, we all feel like there is more to do, and greater milestones to come. We will continue to provide exceptional service to patients and referral sources alike to ensure that we continue to improve and grow.

Cheers, and here’s to the next 1000!