Happy New Year!

Did you make a New Year’s Resolution this year?  If so, you are among a shrinking minority of adults who did that very thing.  Check out these statistics from the University of Scranton Journal of Clinical Psychology (12.13.12):

Rank Top 10 New Years resolutions for 2012
1
Lose Weight
2
Getting Organized
3
Spend Less, Save More
4
Enjoy Life to the Fullest
5
Staying Fit and Healthy
6
Learn Something Exciting
7
Quit Smoking
8
Help Others in Their Dreams
9
Fall in Love
10
Spend More Time with Family
News Years Resolution Statistics Data
Percent of Americans who usually make New Year’s Resolutions 45%
Percent of Americans who infrequently make New Year’s Resolutions 17%
Percent of Americans who absolutely never make New Year’s Resolutions 38%
Percent of people who are successful in achieving their resolution 8%
Percent who have infrequent success 49%
Percent who never succeed and fail on their resolution each year 24%
OF NOTE: People who explicitly make resolutions are 10 times more likely to attain their goals than people who don’t explicitly make resolutions.
Type of Resolutions (Percent above 100% because of multiple resolutions) Data
Self Improvement or education related resolutions 47%
Weight related resolutions 38%
Money related resolutions 34%
Relationship related resolutions 31%
Age Success Rates Data
Percent of people in their twenties who achieve their resolution each year 39%
Percent of people over 50 who achieve their resolution each year 14%
Length of Resolutions Data
Resolution maintained through first week 75%
Past two weeks 71%
Past one month 64%
Past six months 46%

 

As you can see from the numbers, by the sixth month over half of us have mailed it in and succumbed to the powerful forces of the old habit(s) that we were trying to change.  But still, half of us do make it, and that can be a very powerful change for the better for many people.  I find it interesting that just by making a resolution, you have increased your chances ten-fold that you will succeed, regardless of age or type of resolution that you made.  So no matter what, it is imperative that you explicitly state what you are trying to accomplish, write it down, and tell lots of people what your intentions are.  All of those actions will enhance your odds of sticking it through and creating new patterns of behavior that will better your quality of life.

Of course, many of the New Year’s resolutions have to do with trying to achieve a better state of health in the coming year.  This can involve dietary changes, increased exercise, reducing stress, and more.  These are not easy changes, but they are possible, and any level of success in keeping them can only be a benefit.  The most important thing to do is to keep trying–especially in the first few critical weeks–even if you fail to meet your stated goal.  Let’s say you resolved to exercise daily in 2013, but on a particular day, you skipped it because you were not feeling well, it was too dark, it was raining, your clothes were stinky from the last session, etc.  Do not take this as an abject failure.  Accept the fact that occasionally you are going to fall a bit short, and then get right back on the program.  Keep a positive mind and do not let one or two slip-ups alter the long term goals you are out to achieve.  Experts say that it takes 21 days for something (like exercise) to become a habit, and six months for it to become part of your personality.  Stick with it, and soon it will become second nature.

Given the high rates of failure with any resolutions, whether made on New Year’s Eve or otherwise, we here at Infusion Solutions wish you the best of luck in 2013 with your particular goals.  We encourage and support your efforts!

 

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